Step 5 – Grow Your Income – Financial Offense vs Defense

It’s been said that “Offense wins games, Defense wins championships”. Similar to sports, you need good offense and defense to be successful financially.

I like to refer to things like budgeting and frugal living as financial defense. Spending money can be very easy, and have good financial defense ensures that you aren’t spending everything you earn and are saving and investing for the future.

Financial offense is your income. Growing your income and career are some of the best investments you can make to enable financial success.

Financial success is NOT guaranteed with a higher income, but it certainly helps.

To illustrate this point, let me share an interaction with a prospective client several years ago that I will never forget. He called my office and asked to set up an appointment with a financial advisor. Our office had 8-10 different financial advisors, and like many financial service companies, we generally determined what advisor a client was paired with based on the amount of money they had to invest. This segmentation of clients is common since different strategies and complexities exist for larger portfolios than smaller portfolios that may not have as many alternatives. The prospect wasn’t very forthcoming about his investments, but assured the scheduler that he probably should meet with the most experienced advisor in the office. When he came in, it wasn’t long before we realized that he was the poster child for the phrase “all hat, no cattle“.

This prospect bragged that for the preceding 8 years, his income had been between $500,000 and $800,000 per year as an attorney, and felt he had reasonable expectations for that income level to continue. Clearly he had done well growing his income and playing financial offense. The problem though was that he was not very good at financial defense. His total investable assets (checking/savings accounts, investment accounts, retirement accounts) were only about $100,000. Where did it all go? Well, he had a beautiful house and an equally beautiful vacation home, both of which were worth considerably less than he owed on them. He also had multiple very expensive luxury vehicles with very large car payments. If that wasn’t enough, he also felt that his income justified picking up aviation as a hobby, so he had bought a small airplane for $300,000 or so. In total, his debts were approaching $2 million and he had a negative net worth. It was hard to believe that someone with that high of income could be living paycheck to paycheck.

Sadly (or maybe not so sadly), this person never ended up becoming a client of ours. He didn’t have enough investable assets to meet my minimums, and our philosophies differed so much that it wasn’t worth making an exception.

On the flip side, I have met several people who have become millionaires while earning average $40-50,000 incomes, but mastering financial defense.

The point of this is that YES, growing your income is useful in building wealth, but doing so can be meaningless if financial defense isn’t also practiced.

In the next post I’ll continue discussing financial offense, including my income history and what I’ve done to grow my income.

Leave a Reply