Thank you, YouTube

I’m a big advocate of do-it-yourself solutions and do most things myself around the house and with money management. Between my wife and I, there aren’t many things we can’t do or figure out how to do around the house. One skill that isn’t in my wheelhouse though is fixing cars. Growing up, I never got much experience working on cars and we didn’t really have any motorized toys on which I could have learned about engines. In recent years, I’ve had to accumulate a lot more motorized yard equipment and tools (riding lawnmower, push mower, leaf blower, weed-eater, chainsaw, pressure washer, etc), most of which have needed some type of maintenance or repair.

Whenever something has needed to be fixed, I’ve learned that I can find out how to fix pretty much anything on YouTube. I found the knowhow there to take apart my riding lawnmower and change some pulleys and belts, repair the carburetor of my push mower, and more. When it comes to fixing cars, I’ve always been reluctant to do anything serious myself since the risk/reward doesn’t seem to be worth it. If my lawnmower doesn’t get fixed quickly, my grass gets long. Not too big of a thing in the big picture.

If my car breaks down though, I need it fixed pretty quickly to not disrupt my work schedule. If it isn’t done properly, I could put myself or other drivers in danger. Add to equation that I live 25 miles from work and you can see how I rely on my vehicles much more than anything else I own with a motor.

As I pulled my wife’s car into the garage tonight, the engine mysteriously died just before I could turn the ignition off. It seemed odd, so I tried to start it back up, but it wouldn’t start. Luckily I was already home when this happened, but it was still troublesome. Then when I opened the door I smelled gas. Not good. To be safe, I put it in neutral and pushed it back out into the driveway (surprisingly easy for a truck that weighs around 6,000 pounds). When I tried to start it again with the door open, I heard fuel dripping onto the driveway as soon as I turned the key. Again, not good. At this time, I started to go through my options. I figured I could get it towed to a nearby mechanic, where I’d pay ~$90 for diagnostics and then at least $50 for a repair if it was as simple as reconnecting something that had come loose, but potentially a lot more if the problem were larger. Option two was to do a little bit of my own investigating to see if it was something I could fix myself and only go to a mechanic as a last resort. Naturally, I went with option 2.

With just a few minutes of Google and YouTube searching, I found a few possible solutions and went back out to look underneath the car to see where the leak was coming from. Sure enough, the fuel line connection to the fuel filter had come loose (see the following picture) and in just a few minutes I was able to reconnect everything and we were back in business. I’ll want to keep my eye on it and, if it starts to reoccur, look into replacing the part since it’s not acceptable for it to come loose, but from what I’ve researched we should be good to go.

I love that we’re in a spot financially that if I did need to take the car to the shop it wouldn’t be a financial burden, but really didn’t want to deal with the hassle of getting it to the shop, picking it up, etc. We definitely live in an incredible day and age with so much information at our fingertips, thanks to YouTube and some random people posting videos of themselves fixing their vehicles.

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